Our Community
Counselling Individuals Away From the Path of Radicalisation
Close to 300 community volunteers were recognised for their efforts in rehabilitating and assisting the families of those who have been radicalised by extremist ideology at an appreciation lunch on 30 September 2017.

Mr Ahmad Saiful Rijal Hassan, 31 is greatly aware of the threat posed by the dangerous extremist ideology spread by ISIS to the community. For the past four years, the researcher at the S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies has dedicated himself to combating the spread of such ideology as a volunteer with the Religious Rehabilitation Group (RRG).

Launched in April 2003, the RRG’s original goal was to rehabilitate and educate detained members of the regional terrorist group Jemaah Islamiyah (JI). RRG’s volunteers have since expanded their work and taken on the task of spreading awareness among the Muslim community, as well as the community at large, about the dangers of ISIS ideology.

“The RRG has been advising parents and teachers to provide accurate information with regard to religion. Whenever they have issues with religious matters, the right approach is to seek clarification from accredited teachers,” said Mr Ahmad.

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Mr Ahmad Saiful Rijal Hassan has spent the last four years dedicated to combating the spread of extremist ideology as a volunteer with the Religious Rehabilitation Group. PHOTO: Amni Amran


Mr Ahmad Saiful Rijal Hassan is a volunteer with the Religious Rehabilitation Group
Mr Ahmad Saiful Rijal Hassan has spent the last four years dedicated to combating the spread of extremist ideology as a volunteer with the Religious Rehabilitation Group. PHOTO: Amni Amran
In his spare time, Mr Ahmad shares his experiences in rehabilitating those who had been swayed by ISIS’s ideology. He emphasised that helping radicalised individuals recognise the error of their ways must be a community effort.

“Whether a person can be guided away from the path of radicalisation also depends on their family and loved ones. One way that an individual can be put on the path of rehabilitation is if their family members are active in seeking help and clarification on whether the person has been radicalised,” said Mr Ahmad.

Apart from radicalised individuals, help must also be provided to the family members and children of such individuals. One organisation that has dedicated itself to this mission is the Inter-Agency Aftercare Group (ACG).

Formed in 2002, the ACG provides various forms of aftercare services and counselling to the wives and children of radicalised individuals. Aftercare services are provided through short term financial grants, educational support and long-term counselling among other services.

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Mr Abdul Halim Kader is a founding member of the Inter-Agency Aftercare Group and President of Taman Bacaan or Singapore Malay Youth Library. PHOTO: Amni Amran


Mr Abdul Halim Kader is a founding member of the Inter-Agency Aftercare Group 
Mr Abdul Halim Kader is a founding member of the Inter-Agency Aftercare Group and President of Taman Bacaan or Singapore Malay Youth Library. PHOTO: Amni Amran
“We believe that Malay-Muslim organisations play a great part in providing care and counselling to affected family members. All of our volunteers must do our part to provide early intervention to these families and prevent further radicalisation,” said Mr Abdul Halim Kader, 66, a founding member of the ACG.

The contributions of volunteer organisations such as the RRG and ACG were recognised during the 13th Ministry of Home Affairs appreciation lunch on 30 September 2017.

Home Team News
Guest-of-Honour Deputy Prime Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security Mr Teo Chee Hean (fourth from right) interacting with a volunteer during the lunch. PHOTO: Amni Amran


Deputy Prime Minister Mr Teo Chee Hean interacting with a volunteer 
Guest-of-Honour Deputy Prime Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security Mr Teo Chee Hean (fourth from right) interacting with a volunteer during the lunch. PHOTO: Amni Amran
Speaking in Malay during the lunch, Guest-of-Honour Deputy Prime Minister and Coordinating Minister for National Security Mr Teo Chee Hean thanked the volunteers for their efforts and emphasised the importance of building strong community bonds.

“We enjoy harmony because we have these guide-ropes…to help us progress on our journey towards our aspiration to be one united people regardless of race, language or religion. This requires the commitment and continued support of all communities and Singaporeans,” said Mr Teo.

Early reporting enables individuals who are at risk of radicalisation to be given proper guidance and counselling and could be steered away from the path of radicalization. Anyone who knows or suspects that a person is radicalised can call the ISD Counter-Terrorism Centre hotline 1800 2626 473.
© 2019 Ministry of Home Affairs, Singapore. All Rights Reserved.


  1. by Jaiesh Sachi
  2. 05 October 2017
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